Bariatric Surgeries


We offer the Sleeve Gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Duodenal Switch, as well as revisional surgery if you are dealing with issues related to a prior bariatric surgery. If you are looking for a surgeon to help you with a previously placed gastric adjustable band we may also be of service.

There are many types of bariatric surgeries. We encourage you to investigate all the different types of surgeries available. The decision on which procedure will best fits your needs is ultimately best made with the help of a bariatric surgeon.

The following bariatric surgeries are the most commonly performed in the United States currently:

Sleeve Gastrectomy – involves surgically removing the left side of the stomach, leaving a much smaller stomach about the size and shape of a banana, maintaining the basic function of the original stomach. The pyloric valve is preserved. This valve is at the last portion of the stomach and allows food to pass through to the small bowel when it is at the right chemical and mechanical consistency.

Roux-en-Y bypass (Gastric Bypass) – a small pouch is created at the top portion of the stomach and connecting it to a limb of small bowel. It is important to note this pouch does not function the same as a normal stomach. There are several variations of the Roux-en-Y Bypass (i.e. Long limb RNY, Short Limb RNY, Mini Gastric Bypass)

Duodenal Switch (Gastric Reduction Duodenal Switch) – The stomach is decreased in size by performing the Sleeve Gastrectomy. The small bowel is then reattached in a fashion to keep the digestive juices away from the food until it reaches the last portion of the small bowel, limiting absorption of the nutrients in the food eaten. A key point of the Duodenal Switch is the preservation of the pyloric valve. This valve is at the last portion of the stomach and allows food to pass through to the small bowel when it is at the right chemical and mechanical consistency. Currently, there is also a loop version of this procedure being performed, that so far has shown to create less risk of malnutrition and vitamin deficiency problems.

Continue scrolling down to see detailed descriptions of each surgery, which include specific advantages and disadvantages.

We also recommend that you check your BMI with the calculator below. Most insurance companies require patients to be a body mass index (BMI) of 40 kg/m2 or greater, or a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or above with weight-related medical problems before they will consider authorizing bariatric surgery for you.

Sleeve Gastrectomy / Gastric Sleeve

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Gastric Bypass


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Duodenal Switch


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Sleeve Gastrectomy / Gastric Sleeve

This procedure involves removal of approximately 80 – 85% of your stomach's volume; the remaining stomach is secured closed with staples and suture. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The sleeve gastrectomy does not involve cutting or changing the sphincter muscles that allow food to enter or leave the stomach. When you eat after having this surgery, the smaller stomach will fill up quickly. You will feel full after eating just a very small amount of food. It is important that you follow the diet instructions provided by your surgeon.

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šThe sleeve is technically an easier surgery to perform than other anatomy-altering surgeries, making complications less likely

šThere is no bypassing of any intestine, which makes it less likely to cause problems with malnutrition, vitamin deficiency

šSince there is no re-arrangement of the small intestines, there is no risk of marginal ulceration or dumping syndrome like there is with a gastric bypass; nor is there a risk of internal hernia like there is with a gastric bypass or duodenal switch


Gastric Bypass

There are two parts to this procedure. The creation of a small stomach pouch and then the creation of the Roux-en-Y intestinal bypass. The procedure is done mainly laparoscopically, and rarely through an open incision. After the surgery, food passes from the stomach pouch into the jejunum, bypassing the duodenum. This reduces some absorption of calories and nutrients, though currently research has shown that bariatric surgery works mainly from altering the balance of gut hormones, which decreases the sensation of hunger as well as the set weight that the body tries to maintain.

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šThe gastric bypass has been performed since the 1950’s, making it the oldest surgery still performed and the most studied

šThe RYGB has a good record of long-term weight loss maintenance (50-60% Excess Weight Loss)

šIt also has a good record of resolution of medical problems

šIt is one of the best procedures for treating heartburn


Duodenal Switch

This procedure also has two parts and is sometimes done in stages. One of the benefits of Duodenal Switch is the preserving of the pyloric value. This procedure is done both Laparoscopic and Open. The stomach or restrictive portion of this procedure is the Sleeve Gastrectomy. The small bowel is divided into two parallel limbs, one limb is attached to the stomach and the other is attached to at the Duodenum (small intestine) this will keep the biliopancreatic juices away from the food you eat, until the last portion of the small intestine were the limbs are reconnected. This is commonly referred to as the common channel.

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The duodenal switch has an excellent record of long-term weight loss maintenance (70-80% excess weight loss)

There are less issues with dumping and reactive hypoglycemia compared to the gastric bypass

The duodenal switch is an excellent surgery for severe diabetes

Risks of Bariatric Surgery